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Sunday, June 25 2017 @ 07:32 AM AKDT

Free-Range Big Lake chickens

Pets and AnimalsHere are a couple of the Barred Rock out for their daily free range foraging. They love the lowbush cranberries.

Taken yesterday Photo by Dennis Garrett

The black box is a bat house I need to put on a tree. There's still snow on the ground, but they scratch around in the leaf litter and find hibernating insects, seeds, and other things that they like. This is a very hardy Alaskan-adapted breed, and I plan to expand. Right after I took this pic I had to round them up because an Eagle was hanging out in a tree.

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Free-Range Big Lake chickens | 5 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Free-Range Big Lake chickens
Authored by: Anonymous on Sunday, March 29 2015 @ 06:29 PM AKDT
How do they survive the winter?
Free-Range Big Lake chickens
Authored by: Big Lake Resident on Sunday, March 29 2015 @ 07:15 PM AKDT
They have a heated chicken coop
Free-Range Big Lake chickens
Authored by: DG on Monday, March 30 2015 @ 04:32 PM AKDT
They are a very cold-tolerant breed. They don't need a heated house, but they won't lay when the hours of daylight are few. They just need food and water, and a draft-free roost.

Forgot to add: they have an insulated house for a roost.
Edited on Monday, March 30 2015 @ 04:34 PM AKDT by DG
Free-Range Big Lake chickens
Authored by: Steven on Tuesday, March 31 2015 @ 12:21 PM AKDT
OK so you're saying that chickens won't freeze and don't need a heated coop? I find that very hard to believe.
Free-Range Big Lake chickens
Authored by: DG on Tuesday, March 31 2015 @ 12:32 PM AKDT
Those birds are proof of my statements. This is not the first or only flock of poultry I have raised in Alaska. My first flock was in a much more rural area of Alaska, and the only electricity we had was from solar, wind, and a generator which was for emergencies only. I built a small (maybe 4' high) chicken coop and insulated it very well, with adjustable ventilation.

They all did well, survived -50F.

Related article: Too cold for chickens? Heat lamps aren't needed, instead are a danger http://thebiglaketimes.com/article.ph...3124743940